Knitting for History: Yarn Bombing the DC-3

Knitting for History – Yarn Bombing the DC-3

On August 11th, 2012, the Yarn Bomb Yukon Collective yarn bombed the DC-3 plane owned by the Yukon Transportation Museum.  This interactive art project was created in partnership with the Yukon Transportation Museum and the Yukon Arts Centre Public Art Gallery.  The idea for the project came from Casey McLaughlin, Director and Curator for the Yukon Transportation Museum and the project was taken on by the Yarn Bomb Yukon Collective. In four months the Yarn Bomb Yukon collective hosted over 35 workshops on how to knit, crochet and yarn bomb and over 100 people volunteered to knit, crochet and sew the yarn bomb together. The project was featured on CBC News program The National, the Toronto Star, CBC Hamilton, Vancouver Sun, local, national  and international radio and television shows, blogs, and magazines, promoting fibre arts to thousands of people.

The Yarn Bomb Yukon Collective will continue to promote fibre arts by yarn bombing  Whitehorse and beyond and are open to suggestions, offers and commissions from individuals and organizations across North America.    Please post on our facebook wall, send us an email or tweet on what you think our next project should be.  We’ll continue to yarn bomb and free offer knitting, crochet and yarn bombing workshops, teaching classes, and leading community/fibre base art projects.

The purpose of this interactive public art project is to transform a historic aircraft into a large scale public art project, to foster an appreciation for fibre arts, and to teach the lifelong skill knitting and crocheting techniques to adults and children.   Once the project is complete, blankets will be donated to local charities and shelters.

This is an excellent example of partnership between museums and the public.  The project presents an exciting opportunity to teach the public about the aviation history of Yukon through the artifact of the DC-3 as well as educating the public on conservation and preservation of historic transportation artifacts.  As Casey McGlauglan, director of YTM stated in her letter of support:

“This will be the biggest opportunity in YTM’s history to educate all involved and beyond as to what a DC-3 is and the significance of the CF-CPY in the Yukon and abroad.  Every person that picks up a needle, listens to the radio, attends a knitting bee or looks at a poster regarding this project will instantly become a captive audience for us to educate on the importance of musicological standards of industrial artifacts and the importance of conservation and maintenance to objects many people feel don’t need the attention…from this one project YTM will now have hundreds of opportunities locally and nationally to educate the world on the importance of conservation, preservation and Yukon history and ingenuity.”

“This is an exciting project that could only happen through partnership,” says Mary Bradshaw, Gallery Director of the Yukon Arts Centre.  “All three partners are thrilled to work together and with the public.  Because really, this is a massive project—we need everyone to help by picking up their knitting needles.”

Knitting for History – Yarn-Bombing the DC-3 was an overwhelmingly positive experience and a unique opportunity to collaborate with non-traditional museum partners. It was my first attempt at engaging with the community through a “collection-community connection” project. The project took on a life of its own and it was a great success, thanks largely to the huge effort of Jessica Vellenga and Yarn Bomb Yukon.

For the Yukon Transportaion Museum, the cornerstone of yarn-bombing the DC-3 weather vane was community involvement – people worked hands-on, which connected them at an intimate level to our museum and created a feeling of personal investment and ownership to one of the museums artifacts. We also successfully reached a wide audience while also bolstering local, national and international interest about Yukon, the Yukon Transportation Museum and its unique DC-3 weather vane.

Here’s how to get involved.  Once the project is complete, blankets will be donated to local charities and shelters.


For more info, please check out our timeline below.

     

Time Line Date Started Date Completed
International Call for Submissions April 1, 2012 June 30, 2012
Knitting workshops for kids and adults, 5 total May 1, 2012 June 30, 2012
World Wide Knit in Public workshop June 9, 2012 June 17, 2012
International Yarn Bombing Day workshop June 11, 2012 June 12, 2012
Sit and Stitch Nights from 5-7pm at the T&M Lounge, 4th and Main, Whitehorse, YT Every Wednesday Night ongoing
Atlin Arts and Music Festival, knitting, crochet and yarn bombing workshop and demonstration July 5, 2012 July 8, 2012
Knitting Bees to sew together the knitted cozy at the Old Fire Hall August 1 2012 August 10, 2012
Installation of knitted cozy onto the DC-3 (weather permitting) August 11, 2012 August 12, 2012
De-Installation of knitted cozy from the DC 3 (weather permitting) August 21, 2012 August 21, 2012